Review Metrics & Annual Reports



Annual Sustainability Report FY09-10

This Annual Report highlights the key accomplishments, activities and challenges of UCSF’s Chancellor’s Advisory Committee on Sustainability (CACS) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2009-2010, as well as plans and goals for the FY 2010-2011.

This past year was a time of leadership change for UCSF, as a new chancellor came on board, the CACS co-chairs resigned and retired, and a new sustainability manager was hired. Yet despite the transition, the CACS made significant and measurable progress toward making UCSF more sustainable and achieving UC Office of the President (UCOP) sustainability goals.

Clean Energy/Water

Con Contagious 200

Mission

Conserve the use of energy, water and nonrenewable resources, as well as promoting the use of renewable resources.

UC Policy

  • System wide, install 10 MW of renewable energy by 2014.
  • Provide 20 percent of energy needs using renewable resources by 2010.
  • Reduce energy consumption per square foot by 10 percent or more from 2000 level by 2014.

Recent Accomplishments

  • Updated the SEP, outlining a range of energy efficiency projects, such as retrofits, boiler replacement, energy efficient lighting upgrades and a PC power management program.
  • Launched the “Conservation is Contagious” program in 12 buildings, reducing energy use in select buildings by six percent and saving $800,000.
  • We are making progress toward our goal of reducing energy use by 10 percent by 2014—we have reduced use three percent over the past three years. 
  • Outreach to lab managers and departments with autoclaves for installation of water saving devices.

FY 2010-2011 Goals

  • Continue progress to cut energy consumption by 10 percent or more by 2014 from the year 2000 base consumption level.
  • Extend “Conservation is Contagious” to 4 more buildings to reduce electricity use by 2.5 percent and save approximately $290,000.
  • Continue outreach to lab managers and departments for installation for autoclave water saving devices.
  • Campus wide replacement of old refrigerators, printers and CRTs w/ energy efficient ones.
  • Continue implementation of Strategic Energy Plan for estimated energy savings of $824,000.

Metrics

  • Total energy consumption in MW and dollars
  • MW grid-purchased renewable energy sources and dollars
  • On-site renewable energy generation in KW

Challenges

  • Complexity in retrofitting obsolete equipment and/or systems.
  • High project cost impact finding the appropriate portfolio of projects with a suitable rate of return.
  • Policy constraints and project delivery methodology.
  • The risk of using new technologies considered to be energy efficient and yet pricey.
  • Standardization and inventory control.
  • Balancing qualitative and quantitative benefits.

Related Links and Resources



Climate Change

CCAR 200

Mission

Promote and encourage carbon neutrality in the campus built and leased environment and transportation programs.

UC Policy

  • By 2014, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 2000 levels.
  • By 2020, reduce GHG emissions to 1990 levels.
  • Develop an action plan for becoming climate neutral as soon as possible.

Recent Accomplishments

  • Became a member of the California Climate Action Registry (CACR).
  • In FY 2007-2008, saved $1.2 million in energy savings and reduced greenhouse gas emissions by 5,000 tons (FY 2009-2010 numbers not yet available).
  • Completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory for calendar year 2009 to identify where our GHG emissions are originating. We are currently having our 2009 emissions data verified by an independent third party for CCAR reporting.
  • Began a preliminary Climate Action Plan (CAP) that lays out potential opportunities for reducing the campus’ carbon footprint.
  • Signed the American College and University President’s Climate Commitment, a broad effort by the nation’s higher education institutions to address global warming by tracking, reporting and reducing their greenhouse gas emissions.

Where We Are Today

  • The vast majority of our GHG emissions come from energy consumption: natural gas use (55%) electricity use on campus (15%) and electricity use in leased spaces (2%).  The other major contributor is travel: commuter travel (14%) and airline travel (8%).  Emission numbers for FY 2009-2010 are currently being verified and were not available for inclusion in this report.
  • To meet the UCOP 2014 goal, UCSF will focus on the reduction measures outlined in the CAP, as well as implement additional recommendations found in the SEP.

FY 2010-2011 Goals

  • Contract with GHG software solution to track, monitor, model and report all emission sources.
  • Complete the development of a Sustainability Action Plan with specific recommendations for achieving the UC Regent’s emission goals for 2014, 2020 and 2030.
  • Begin to implement the projects outlined in the Strategic Energy Plan (SEP).

Metrics

  • Track emissions sources from energy, water, waste, travel and operations in metric tonnes per year
  • Track compliance with UC Regents, regulatory and reporting agency goals

Challenges

  • Because UCSF is a rapidly growing institution, including plans to build a new medical center at Mission Bay, the CAP predicts that meeting the 2020 goal, which will require cutting emissions by almost 50 percent to reach 1990 levels, “will not be a simple task”.


Education/Communication

Earthfest flyer

Mission

Inform, educate and influence the university community and beyond about sustainable initiatives at UCSF.

Recent Accomplishments

  • Held a successful 10th Annual EarthFest/Bike to Work Day on May 13, 2010, coordinated jointly by the Campus Life Services, Transportation and Facilities Management-Recycling. The event brought together more than 70 vendors, non-profit organizations and other “green groups” to the UCSF campus to “inform, inspire and engage” the UCSF community about sustainability.  Achieved largest attendance to date for an EarthFest event with more than 1,500 participants.

  • Held EarthFest film festival at 654 Minnesota Street showing two award-winning episodes of Autodesk sponsored documentaries on the “Economies of Being Environmentally Conscious” weekly over a five- week period.

  • Held a well-attended Earth Day event sponsored by SF Public Utilities Commission (PUC), Campus Life Services, Facilities Management and Peasant Pies. Showed “Tapped, the Movie” at Mission Bay campus on April 22, 2010.  Twenty-five students and staff attended.  SF PUC gave away steel water bottles and hosted a discussion afterwards.

  • Published three major news and events articles in UCSF Today and three in Medical Center Update.

  • Developed the UCSF Sustainability website, due to be launched when, and hired and directed a dedicated sustainability writer to create original content highlighting UCSF success stories and ongoing efforts to improve. Other content includes facts and tips, UCSF sustainability activities, a calendar, resources and engagement opportunities.

    FY 2010-2011 Goals

  • Assist work groups to engage employees, students and community on sustainability practices.
  • Communicate to the campus community news and upcoming sustainability programs and events.
  • Metrics

  • Number of sustainability events per year
  • Attendance at sustainability events per year
  • Visits to sustainability website and sustainability stories
  • Challenges

  • Limited budget
  • Large and diverse workforce/student population across multi-site campus
  • Related Links and Resources

    Office of Sustainability 
    UCSF to host EarthFest Bike to Work Day



    Green Building

    CVR green roof 250

    Mission

    Promote sustainable strategies in new construction of UCSF facilities to reduce the impact on the environment.

    UC Policy

  • All new buildings, other than acute care facilities, built to outperform Title 24 by at least 20 percent. Strive for 30 percent.
  • All new buildings to be LEED-NC “Silver“ rating at minimum but strive for “Gold” rating or higher.
  • All laboratories to be LEED-NC “Silver” or better and meeting Lab’s 21 criteria.
  • All new buildings will achieve at least two LEED-NC’s water efficiency credits.
  • All renovation projects over $5 million to be LEED-CI certified.
  • Recent Accomplishments

  • Committed to building all new campus construction to at least the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED Silver standard.
  • The new UCSF Mission Bay Medical Center, currently in design phase, is expected to be a LEED Gold facility.v

  • Two projects have recently received LEED-CI Certification:  UCSF Data Center (Silver) and 654 Minnesota Street Renovation (Certification).
  • Tracked construction waste diversion for nine Capital Projects.
  • Began development of Sustainable Standards for campus, the medical center and real estate services.
  • While under construction, the new Smith Cardiovascular Research Building team increased the LEED project points from Silver to a Gold rating target by implementing additional sustainability measures, including construction of a green roof.
  • FY 2010-2011 Goals

  • Capital Programs will renovate two buildings and obtain LEED-CI Certification and build one new building that receives LEED-NC certification.
  • Complete a draft of the sustainable guidelines for renovation and new construction.
  • Real Estate Services will have one tenant improvement and one new building LEED Silver certified.v

    Metrics

  • Number of LEED-CI certifications
  • Number of LEED-NC certifications
  • Gross Square Feet (gsf) of LEED-NC and gsf LEED-CI
  • Percentage of total gsf LEED certified
  • Challenges

  • Implementing LEED standards across three separate campuses (MZ/MB/Parn), specialized construction types (education/laboratory/health care) and departments (Capital Projects/Medical Center Design & Construction/Real Estate).
  • Securing additional funding for potential sustainable capital costs.
  • Meeting the minimum standards set by the Regent’s Policy in times of ever decreasing budgets.
  • Related Links and Resources


    Green Buildings at UC
    US Green Building Council
    USGBC Northern California Chapter
    Green Guide for Healthcare



    Health Care

    PGH award

    Mission

    Promote and practice a culture of sustainability in patient care settings.

    Recent Accomplishments

  • Received the “Partner for Change Award” from Practice Greenhealth for overall sustainability performance within the medical center. The award, issued on May 12, 2010, recognizes health care facilities that have developed successful pollution prevention programs and recognizes outstanding environmental innovation in health care. UCSF is the first UC campus to achieve this sustainability award. 
  • Participated in projects within the Center for Occupational and Environmental Health (COEH) projects in the community, reflecting our committment to sustainability. 
  • Contracted with Stericycle®, a medical waste and sharps disposal company, to collect, disinfect and reuse plastic containers for “sharps”—hypodermic needles and other sharp tools such as scalpels—as well as certain containers for medications. This change will divert more than 100,000 pounds of plastic waste from landfills and save about $250,000 a year.
  • Switched from disposable patient pillows to vinyl-covered reusable ones that are cleaned and disinfected after each patient is discharged from the hospital. In the past, the medical center purchased about 160,000 disposable pillows a year, resulting in 296,000 pounds of waste. The change to reusable pillows is expected to save the medical center $250,000 a year.
  • Generated $ 65,077.00 from the sale of used (surplus) medical/surgical equipment, saving 36,630 pounds from going to the landfill. Donated $1,500 worth of equipment to the World Family Ethiopian Orphans and Medical Care.
  • Seventeen percent of all medical center waste was recycled, composted or reused.
  • FY 2010-2011 Goals

  • Achieve the Practice Greenhealth Partner for Change with distinction award or higher.
  • Identify health care sustainability focus areas and corresponding performance measures.
  • Participate in the Green Guide for Health care pilot program. 
  • Advocate for sustainable practices through policy development and operating procedures.
  • Develop at least one new education/information program on environmental health and sustainability issues for the UCSF medical center community.
  • Increase the percentage of reusable medical products through reprocessing of single use devices versus disposal products.
  • Install the fluid waste management system at all three-surgery departments to send fluid waste to sewer instead of medical waste treatment and disposal.
  • Reduce/eliminate the use of blue wrap and increase reusable hard cases for sterilization.
  • Metrics

  • Medical supplies donated in tons
  • Solid waste diversion rate
  • Challenges

  • Budget constraints.
  • No organizational structure to coordinate sustainability efforts.
  • Related Links and Resources

  • Practice Greenhealth - http://www.practicegreenhealth.org
  • Alliance of Nurses for Healthy Environments - http://e-commons.org/anhe
  • Healthcare Without Harm - http://www.noharm.org
  • Environmental Working Group - http://www.ewg.org
  • Univeristy of Maryland EnviRN - http://envirn.umaryland.edu
  • UCSF Today Articles:
  • http://today.ucsf.edu/stories/ucsf-medical-center-receives-recognition-for-sustainable-practices
    http://today.ucsf.edu/stories/ucsf-medical-center-receives-rebates-for-going-green



    Procurement

    Aspen 30 200

    Mission

    Build economically viable and environmentally preferable purchasing practices in support of the UCSF sustainability initiatives.

    UC Policy

    • For product categories that have available ENERGY STAR rated products, the University will focus efforts on purchasing these products consistent with the needs of UC researchers.
    • For all electronic equipment, the supplier will deliver the items to the University with energy efficient and conservation features enable (EPEAT labeled).
    • The university will phase out the use of virgin paper and adopt a minimum standard of 30 percent PCW recycled content paper for all office supplies.

    Recent Accomplishments

    • Developed a purchasing program that negotiates competitive prices for greener office supplies and equipment.
    • In 2009, more than half (60 percent) of the paper purchased for the campus had some recycled content, saving more than 2000 trees, an increase of 13 percent from 2008 levels.
    • In 2009, 12 percent of all campus purchases were fully automated, eliminating   paper   for transactions, which saves money and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.
    • Initiated a printer exchange program to replace older units with Energy Star certified units with double-sided printing capability, faster print speed and micro-toner capability.
    • Launched a warehouse-stocking program for high-traffic office supplies (paper and toner cartridges) to reduce truck traffic on campus and encourage use of recycled paper (Aspen 30 with 30 percent post consumer waste recycled content).

    FY 2010-2011 Goals

    • Expand warehouse-stocking program to include janitorial supplies and general laboratory supplies.
    • Increase electronic commerce to 50 percent of invoices and 25 percent of orders.
    • Develop a closed loop recycling program for animal cages.
    • Support effort of Clean Energy work group to exchange refrigerators and monitors for Energy Star rated units.

    Metrics

    • Percentage of sustainable product spend of total purchases
    • Measure percentage of paper purchased with PCW recycled content

    Challenges

    • Limited budget and need for seed money to initiative new programs.
    • Inability to restrict purchases to sustainable options due to personal preferences and department spend with non-agreement suppliers not vetted for sustainable profile (i.e. purchasing virgin, non-PCW recycled paper from non-agreement suppliers).

    Related Links and Resources

    The following link provides access to UCSF campus and UC systemwide agreement suppliers, many of whom were vetted for a sustainable profile consistent with the commodity and awarded a systemwide contract. “Campus Purchasing A2Z list



    Sustainable Food

    farmers market 250

    Mission

    To provide healthy sustainably grown food to support a sustainable future.

    UC Policy

    For all campuses to purchase 20 percent of their food from sustainable sources by 2020.

    Recent Accomplishments

    Campus

    • The Going Greener customer facing compost/recycling program expanded to six new locations
    • Formed the Sustainable Food work group to support the CACS, chaired by Jennifer Dowd Retail Services Manager, and Nutrition & Food Service (NFS) Assistant Director Jack Henderson.  The work group is charged with implementing the UCOP Sustainable Foodservices Practices Policy Guidelines.
    • Completed UCSF’s first Sustainable Foodservices Practices Policy Guidelines for UCOP.  This report included a feasibility study related to leased foodservice operations, as required by the UCOP guidelines.
    • Expanded the popular weekly Farmers’ Market of Pacific Coast Farmers from Parnassus to Mission Bay in April 2009. The markets promote the use of local food.

    Medical Center

    • In 2009, Patient Food Services (PFS) began composting all patient waste food, paper plates, cups, and bowls and recycling all rigid plastics, packaging and waste paper, reducing food waste going to landfill by 87 percent.
    • Introduced an all-natural, local hormone/antibiotic-free beef burger for patients and customers in March 2010.
    • Reduced cardboard tray use from 20,000 per month to approximately 2,000 per month, saving more than $50,000 per year.
    • Approximately 47 percent of UCSF Medical Center produce purchased is from local Bay Area farms.  Overall, 9.5 percent of medical center food purchased is sustainable.
    • Reduced main supplier delivery days from six per week to four per week, saving 10,400 miles of truck service per year.
    • Switched yogurt for patients and customers from a national brand to a local brand that uses milk produced without use of recombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH, also known as rBST), which is given to dairy cows to increase total milk production.


    FY 2010-2011 Goals

    Campus

    • At Millberry Union, divert enough waste to compost and recycling to eliminate one, two-yard garbage dumpster.
    • Expand Going Greener program to Café 24 and Carmelina’s Café in the Mission Center Building.
    • Implement a system for tracking sustainable food procurement by our vendors.
    • Expand the Smart Choice menu to all retail restaurants.
    • Work toward the goal of achieving zero food waste by 2020.

    Medical Center

    • Expand composting to the pot-wash room. This is the last major source of department food waste that can be captured for composting.
    • Identify and log sustainable food purchases for inclusion in the report to UCOP.
    • Further increase the amount of sustainable foods purchased in order to meet the UCOP goal of 20 percent sustainable foods purchased by 2020.


    Metrics

    • Percentage of annual food purchased that is sustainable (medical center and campus vendor purchases)
    • Pounds composted/month at Millberry Food Court Plaza, Courtyard Café and Laurel Heights


    Challenges

    • How to maintain local produce usage in winter months.
    • Working with Novation and USFoods to find more sustainable foods.
    • Retail facilities in mixed-use buildings inherently provide less control over contamination and composting efforts.
    • Difficult to monitor our diversion rates due to indirect relationship with Recology, our waste hauler.
    • Going Greener program at Mission Center Building is on hold pending resolution of rodent issues so that composting can begin.
    • Tracking sustainable food purchases since each vendor purchases products independently.
    • Creating a labeling system to highlight sustainable food choices for retail restaurants.


    Related Links and Resources

    Nutrition & Food Services
    Retail Services
    Smart Choice
    Living Well Resources at UCSF
    CACS
    SF Environment
    Marine Stewardship Council
    SF Health and Sustainble Food Directive



    Sustainable Operations

    rock hall 225

    Mission

    Develop sustainable practices in the maintenance and operation of UCSF facilities to reduce the impact on the environment.

    UC Policy

    • Develop plan to maintain buildings at LEED-EB certified level
    • Submit one building for LEED certification by June 2008
    • Develop LEED credits for specific building type by July 2009
    • Develop implementation and funding plan for LEED certification of all buildings

    Recent Accomplishments

    • Rock Hall, UCSF’s first LEED-EB certification and San Francisco’s first LEED-EB certification for a laboratory building, was dedicated by Chancellor Sue Desmond-Hellmann, Dan Geiger, Executive Director of United States Green Building Council (USGBC), Matt St. Clair, Sustainability Manager for UCOP and Maric Munn, Director of Facilities Management on Feb 5, 2010.  Rock Hall was awarded LEED Silver level certification in August 2009.
    • Fifteen staff members trained on LEED-EB requirements/procedures.
    • Developed energy assessments of all UCSF Instruction and Research (I&R) buildings.
    • Developed an Implementation Plan for extending LEED-EB to all UCSF scope-eligible buildings, including initial screenings for minimum energy efficiency; a Gap Analysis and identification of required projects for each building; schedule for development of certification documentation; and identification of initial funding sources required to complete projects identified in Gap Analysis.

    FY 2010-2011 Goals

    • Complete plan to maintain buildings at LEED-EB certified level or above by July 2012.
    • Submit documentation for LEED-EB certification for Kalmanovitz Library at Parnassus Campus.
    • Select and begin documentation for the next buildings to be submitted for LEED-EB certification.

    Metrics

  • Number of LEED-EB rated buildings certified
  • Challenges

    • Difficult to achieve energy savings within existing aging buildings.
    • Energy Star assessments require new calculations for buildings running off cogeneration power plants.
    • Energy Star assessments require new calculations for buildings housing laboratories.

    Related Links and Resources

  • Green Buildings at UC
  • U.S. Green Building Council
  • USGBC LEED for Existing Buildings
  • 2010 CA Higher Ed Sustainability Conference
  • UCSF Today article

  • UCSF Rocks with first LEED Silver Status for Existing building


  • Zero Waste

    diversion rate 300

    Mission

    To promote best practices in recycling and waste management throughout UCSF.

    UC Policy

    • 50 percent waste diversion by June 30, 2008
    • 75 percent waste diversion by June 30, 2012
    • Zero waste by 2020

    Recent Accomplishments

    The annual recovery of materials at UCSF includes:

    • 3,332 tons of the standard recyclables (aluminum, glass, small rigid plastics, paper and cardboard)
    • 35 tons of scrap metal
    • 8 tons of fluorescent light bulb tubes
    • 3 tons of small batteries
    • 2 tons of toner cartridges
    • 54 tons of electronic waste

    Medical Center

    • Implemented co-mingled recycling and compost in operating rooms and surgery department break rooms.
    • Implemented inpatient room recycling in six nursing units and all nursing break rooms.
    • Replaced disposable pillows with reusable pillows program throughout medical center saving $250,000 per year.
    • Recycled all pipette packaging, plastic boxes and cardboard in the clinical labs.


    Campus

    • Obtained two portable, educational kiosks and two table-top displays. The kiosks will be placed at strategic locations on campus. The table displays will be used at campus events to educate the UCSF community about best practices for re-use, recycling and composting.
    • Began development of a video to provide on-line waste segregation training for all UCSF staff, faculty and students.
    • Set up office kitchens for the food compost program and restroom paper towel composting in School of Nursing, Laurel Heights Campus and Kirkham Child Development Center.
    • Educated individuals in 26 departments, which increased recycling and compost rates and reduced contamination in receptacles.
    • Provided education to 100 percent of custodial staff members to increase recycling and compost recovery rates.

    FY 2010-2011 Goals

    • Increase the volume of materials recycled and composted by an additional 5% (campus and medical center), working toward the goal of diverting 75 percent by 2014.
    • Update and diversify recycling educational outreach throughout UCSF to support above goal.
    • Expand composting for large meetings and events where food is served.
    • Incorporate mandatory waste reduction training for all staff at UCSF.

    Metrics

    • Tonnage of solid waste and diverted waste for medical center and campus

    Challenges

    • Limited budget.
    • Need to expand outreach and education.
    • Meeting the UC goal of diverting 75 percent of waste by 2012.
    • Imbedding culture change across changing student population and large staff population across multi-site campus.

    Related Links

    Recycling Resources
    Distribution and Storage

     



    Transportation

    shuttles in a row

    Mission

    Promote and encourage transportation alternatives to and from, and between, UCSF sites.

    UC Policy

    • Increase Percentage of Low (PZEV) or Zero Emission Vehicles by 20 to 50 percent by 2009-2010 from 2004-2005 levels and/or convert 50% of campus fleet to non-carbon fuel by 2009-2010.
    • By January 2009, have pre-tax transit program for employees in place.  If feasible, collect data on Average Vehicle Ridership (AVR).


    Recent Accomplishments

    • Campus transportation survey completed in May 2009. According to the survey, average vehicle ridership (AVR) is 2.2 for UCSF.
    • Increased the number of fuel-efficient vehicles by 48 percent from 25 in FY 2004-2005 to 42 in FY 2009-2010.
    • Over 25 percent of employees take public transportation to campus, and ridership on the shuttle has more than doubled since 2000, with over 2.3 million passenger boardings in FY 2009-2010.
    • UCSF employees saved over $400,000 in 2009 on public transit commute costs by participating in the UCSF pretax transit program and UCSF reduced payroll taxes by $111,000.
    • Instituted online ride-matching system and reached 1,076 active users.
    • Created 52 reserved carpool stalls and added 15 carpool permit holders.
    • Increased car share participation by 40 percent to 1,349 UCSF members.
    • Received “Best Workplace for Commuters” award issued to employers that meet the National Standard of Excellence in commuter benefits.


    FY 2010-2011 Goals

    • Conduct a campus-wide transportation survey in Fall 2010.
    • Secure a $50,000 grant for new bike cage.
    • Plan and build new 50-100-space bike cage at Parnassus.
    • Secure funding for electric charging stations in collaboration with City CarShare.
    • Add City CarShare to the list of options for emergency ride home program.
    • Add reserved carpool parking at Laurel Heights, Mission Center, and Mt. Zion.
    • Strive for 2,000 pretax transit participants through marketing and outreach.
    • Add two to three new car share pods at various campus sites bring the total to 15-16.
    • Install charging stations for two plug-in hybrid car share vehicles at Parnassus.
    • Create mobile device accessible shuttle schedule and trip planner.
    • Expand use of pretax transit card to include all retail locations.
    • Increase vanpool ridership by five percent through campus marketing and outreach.


    Metrics

    • Average Vehicle Ridership (AVR)
    • Shuttle boardings (#)
    • Car pools/van pools (#)


    Challenges

    To enlist in new participants in light of current budget cuts and reductions in services is a challenge.

    Related Links and Resources

    • Zimride: a fun and easy way to find rides where you need to go and coordinate your daily commute.

    • Need a car to get off campus? Owning a car in the Bay Area is expensive, but luckily there is a more affordable way to get around. City CarShare UCSF membership is open to all UCSF students, staff and faculty. UCSF members receive special discounts and the $300 deposit is waived for all students and staff.

    • Share your ride to UCSF with fellow employees and students by joining a Vanpool — one of the most cost effective ways to commute to UCSF.

    • Since March 2002, UCSF’s Pre-tax Program has allowed employees to deduct qualified transit and vanpool expenses.  The sooner you join the more you save.

    • Take the free, safe, and convenient UCSF Shuttles when traveling between campus locations like 2 million+ riders do every year.

    • Founded by UCSF staff in 1971, the Marin Commute Club provides regularly scheduled service from Marin county to UCSF.

    • Ride your bike to UCSF and park in our large well-lit bike cages at Parnassus or Mission Bay and rest easy that your bike will be safe.  For a complete list if all 700+ UCSF bike parking racks:

    • UCSF ridesharing participants are eligible for Emergency Ride Home benefits that reimburse transit and taxi expenses up to $50 when employees or students need to leave work for an emergency.


    Other Sustainability Activities

    grass bulbGrassroots sustainability activities are organically springing up all around the UCSF campus due to concerns around global climate change and enviromental degredation.  UCSF encourages students, staff, and facutly to take action where they see opportunities to make a difference.

    Academic Senate

    In December 2007, the Academic Senate Sustainability Task Force was created to identify faculty recommendations on how to improve sustainability at UCSF. In January 2009, it submitted Sustainability Recommendations to the Chancellor. Since then, there has not been an official academic senate group charged with working on sustainability.  Rather, a number of individuals, including Tom Newman, CACS member and professor in the Division of Clinical Epidemiology, and Susan Ryan, CACS member and clinical professor in the Anesthesiology Department, have been working on their own to implement various portions of the report’s recommendations. 

    Newman presented two presentations at the 2009 California Higher Education Sustainability Conference and. Ryan published “Global Warming Potential of Inhaled Anesthetics: Application to Clinical Use” in Anesthesia & Analgesia, the official journal of the International Anesthesia Research Society. The paper helps hospitals to quantify their greenhouse gas contribution from inhaled anesthetics and nitrous oxide in carbon dioxide equivalents.

    Academic Senate 2009 Sustainability Recommendations

    Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics Green Committee

    The Green Committee promotes department policies and activities aimed at reducing the environmental impact of their office space and work habits.

    GREEN Club

    Two years ago a small group of Gladstone Institutes employees decided to develop an eco-conscious group called the GREEN (Gladstone Response to Energy and Environmental Needs) Club. They are devoted to our common goals. The GREEN Club’s mission,is “To incorporate practices that will effectively reduce energy and natural resource usage, waste, and environmental impact from Gladstone’s operations. “

    The club believes it is UCSF’s responsibility to place less demand on the environment by modifying daily behavior to foster sustainability and ecological improvement.  Its objective is to help provide a workplace supporting, educating and advocating preservation of the natural environment for the health and safety of our employees, the City of San Francisco, and the globe, now and into the future.

    Through articles in its monthly Gladstone messenger magazine, the club suggests tips and tricks for modern green living both at home and in the lab.  An archive of previous ecotips can be found here.

    Green Group

    The Green Group is an interdisciplinary grassroots sustainability effort at UCSF Medical Center and campus.  Like minded individuals raise awareness and convene to take action to make UCSF a more sustainable health care environment. 

    The UCSF Green Group has been active for over three years.  The group uses a distribution list to update hundreds of members about greening efforts and educational opportunities within the community.  Additionally, members attend monthly meetings and work within their departments to make UCSF more sustainable.  In the past, Green Group members have taken trips to Sunset Scavengers to learn about recycling and composting. Members have helped distribute more thanr 1,500 CFL light bulbs to the UCSF community.  In 2008, the Green Group hosted a daylong educational forum called Focus the Nation.  This national event was one of the largest teach-ins in United States history and had renowned environmental health speakers that discussed health impacts of climate change.

    Some of the recent efforts by the Green Group include making sustainable suggestions, such as supply changes to improve conservation efforts, changing from disposable items to reusable items, and increasing recycling within clinical and office settings.  Ongoing efforts include educational in-services about conservation, recycling and environmental health topics.  The Green Group is currently working to incorporate greening efforts within the magnet status process, presenting environmental health lectures at nursing grand rounds, and integrating sustainability into annual review for staff.

    Greening the Office

    The medical center Administration Analysts established “Greening the Office” goals and implemented the following in FY 2009-2010:

    • Compost bins throughout the fifth floor (including conference rooms)
    • Motion-censored lights in copy room
    • Centralized fax modem
    • Greening the kitchen (with reusable plates and silverware/incorporating biodegradable cups and compostable plates and silverware for plastic; and eliminating paper napkins for compostable paper towels, also used in the restrooms)
    • Posted signs throughout the fifth floor on what is compostable, recyclable and trash

    Remedy

    Remedy at UCSF is a student-run, faculty-supervised organization dedicated to actively promoting the recovery of unused medical supplies and medicines for the purpose of global aid, waste reduction, and cost-effectiveness.  First-year medical students recover, sort, and deliver invaluable medical equipment that would otherwise be discarded due to regulatory requirements or procedural excess.  These supplies and equipment are delivered to a MedShare facility where they are efficiently recovered and redistributed to underserved healthcare facilities in developing countries.  (http://www.medshare.org/).

    Information Technology


    Throughout UCSF, various department information technology services have identified and implemented many energy-saving, waste- and emission-reduction projects.  Most departments have worked independently from one another or have shared information with each other in informal ways.  Some of these activities include installing server software to reduce computer monitor energy use, replacing aging hardware with virtualization, setting network printers to double-sided default, allowing soft copy reporting, implementing teleconference tools and virtual classrooms, implementing “office supply surplus” sharing, web-streaming video for town hall meetings, re-purposing hardware, developing standards for energy efficiency in new tech purchases and implementing various recycling and waste elimination.  All these efforts have saved energy and money, but have not been measured. As we move into FY 2010-2011 with the implementation of IT Operational Excellence efforts, we expect there will be broader adoption of best practices and more consistent tracking to ensure that UCSF staff get the recognition deserved for their sustainability efforts.

    Standing Committee on Library Sustainability

    Karen Butter, University Librarian, formed a task force in 2008 to investigate ways in which the library could promote sustainability. In 2009, a standing committee created to continue the task force’s work, was charged with: making recommendations on cost-effective sustainable strategies (including conservation efforts); developing and implementing an education and training program to inform staff about library, campus and community sustainability initiatives; and coordinating plans with the campus Sustainability Steering Committee.

    Since 2008, the library has accomplished the following: provided recycling containers to all staff and to the public on three of the four floors in the library building on the Parnassus campus; installed power management software provided by Information Technology Services (ITS) for public and staff computers; orders only recycled printer paper, office supplies and toner cartridges; worked with Facilities Management to install energy efficient light fixtures and upgrade the HVAC system to make it work more efficiently; and promoted staff awareness about sustainability through a monthly e-newsletter. The library is awaiting the possibility of providing compost bins in the staff lounge and in the entrance way of the building and signage in the library from Facilities Management about turning off lights and conserving water.